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Platypus need our help

| nature

By Geoff Williams, Australian Platypus Conservancy A juvenile platypus typically emerges from its nesting burrow in mid-summer when it’s around 3-4 months old. They then face a steep learning curve if they are to survive, as their mothers will continue to provide milk for only a few weeks before they are left to fend for …

Are mussels the champions of our rivers?

| nature

By Jonathon Howard I think mussels should be given an award. Afterall, mussels are amazing biofilters, they play a crucial role in keeping rivers healthy, and are an important part of the food web of our inland fisheries. Yet mussels are dying in the thousands, each mass death event brings those endangered molluscs species closer …

Heavenly days

| Living Lightly

By Kirsten Coates We are currently in the midst of a one in a thousand-year event. It’s not a flood or a bushfire or a drought but rather a planetary phenomenon. Over the next few weeks four planets will be in alignment: Saturn, Mars, Venus and Jupiter and we earthlings will be able to witness …

Sustainable Mental Health

| health

By Lauriston Muirhead If you don’t look after your mental health, it can’t look after you.  I am no mental health expert but, being an older person, I have picked up some tips along the way. Exercise – a lot of walking will do, but even better, try to get too breathless to talk – …

Community Cornucopia

| food, garden

By Chris McGorlick  At the height of summer, and as the cusp of Autumn approaches, there is a highly seasonal occurrence that I relish every year. It’s not the flowering of an exotic plant, nor the arrival of a migratory creature, nor the fruiting of a particular vegetable. But rather, the proliferation of harvest …

A climate emergency?

| climate change

By Bruce Key, member of Wodonga Albury Toward Climate Health (WATCH) To their credit, Albury Council recently voted unanimously to declare a climate emergency, becoming the 108th Australian council to do so.  Many people will wonder why it is an emergency, even if they think that more action to mitigate climate change is needed. It is …

Habitat open garden

| garden

By Lizette Salmon, Gardens for Wildlife Albury-Wodonga Project Officer Gardens can provide vital stepping stones for native animals moving through the landscape for food, water, breeding or migratory purposes. Even small habitat gardens have the potential to provide temporary and longer-term refuge for native birds, insects, reptiles and small mammals.  A case in point is …

Hydrogen, panacea or pitfall?

| climate change, energy

By Alan Hewett As we move, albeit tardily, towards a clean energy future, hydrogen has been hailed as a major solution to reducing global emissions, halting climate change and creating employment. What is hydrogen exactly? Well, it is an invisible, colourless and odourless gas that burns cleanly and is the most abundant element in the …

Native plants take over a New Zealand exotic plantation

| nature

By Mick Webster Locals may be interested in a citizen science conservation project undertaken by my brother near Christchurch in New Zealand. Next to his conservation covenanted bush block on the Banks Peninsula is a sizable plantation of exotic Monterey Cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa). These trees were planted 30 years ago on extremely steep land and …

White-plumed honeyeater: a common resident

| nature

By Ian Davidson and Chris Tzaros – Wangaratta Landcare & Sustainability The White-plumed Honeyeater is often one of the first birds to call in the morning and the last to call in the evening. It is commonly observed along the treed waterways and roadsides throughout our district, flitting around the canopies of trees and on …