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Yellow-tufted honeyeater

| garden, nature

By Ian Davidson and Chris Tzaros – Wangaratta Landcare & Sustainability The Yellow-tufted Honeyeater is a visually striking bird. It has an olive-yellow head and broad black mask that extends from the base of its bill, over its eye to the sides of its neck. It looks more striking due to the elongated yellow feathers …

Where will our food come from?

| food, garden

By Charles Robinson As I write, most of the major northern hemisphere rivers are running dry. From the Yangtze to the Thames; from the Mekong to the Po.  The only people celebrating these events are archaeologists as the lowering river levels uncover forgotten ancient artefacts or even sunken warships.  But even archaeologists have to eat. …

The night before Christmas

| community, energy

By Lauriston Muirhead ‘Twas the night before Christmas and all through the land Wind turbines were turning supplying demand. The stockings were hung by the chimney with care; The chimney long rested to clean up the air. The moon on the gum leaves and new-fallen dew Gave the lustre of mid-day to the aspects in …

Sustainable gift guide for the festive season

| Living Lightly

By Sarah Wallis , Halve Waste Team, Albury Waste Management Centre The best way to reduce your waste footprint this festive season is to slowdown, be thoughtful and buy less. Allow yourself the time to shop thoughtfully for each loved one. This might mean keeping a running list of gift ideas for friends and family. …

The hard problem of introduced species: rejecting the call to violence

| nature

By Mike Fuery Every year our attention is drawn to the ongoing degradation of our wilderness ecosystems, and statements apportioning blame to the presence of ‘invasive,’ ‘feral’ or ‘pest’ animals. These pejorative terms do nothing to help us solve the underlying problem and conveniently side-step the reason for them being where they shouldn’t: our species …

Weighing up our energy choices

| energy

By Graham Parton When looking for ways to live lightly, an important consideration relates to our energy sources. Clean energy means lower greenhouse emissions. Australia’s National Party have recently become advocates for nuclear power, and their coalition partners the Liberals would like to have “an intelligent conversation” about it. Both Barnaby Joyce and David Littleproud …

What Has Biodiversity Ever Done For Us?

| nature

By Lauriston Muirhead Biodiversity is the diversity of life found in an ecosystem.  The more biodiverse, the more balanced and resilient the ecosystem.  A diverse ecosystem is more resistant to shocks and will last longer. What has biodiversity ever done for us? Well for a start, it has provided nearly all the oxygen on the …

Garden Planning

| garden, nature

By Jenny Indian A friend of mine recently lamented that when she planned her garden she failed to take into account the importance of planting native vegetation to attract native birds.  Although she had planted some natives, her feeling was that she should have planted a total native garden. On reflection, I thought that was …

How old can trees grow?

| nature

By Alan Hewett What is the single oldest living thing on Earth? Until recently it was a Great Basin bristlecone pine in California called, appropriately, Methuselah. It’s age? 4,853 years old. Amazing as that sounds a tree recently discovered in Chile called Gran Abuelo (great-grandfather), is estimated to be 5,484 years old. This tree is …

Frog habitat matters

| garden, nature

By Anne Stelling, Parklands Albury Wodonga It’s frog season and anyone walking in the parks will be well aware – in some places the evening chorus can be almost deafening! Hearing their combined calls, I find myself listening for one in particular – the big, intermittent ‘gulp’ call of the Eastern Banjo frog. I haven’t …